artist statement

My artmaking process is about the union of technical curiosities and understanding the world as I perceive it. The technical aspects of my work feature hand-cut ornamental inlay, organically shaped carved elements, geometrical veneer work and patterns, multi-faceted angles, complicated traditional joinery, and gradients of natural color. There is a constant negotiation going on between what I want to learn about my craft, and what I want to explore in relation to intimate personal experiences. It can be a conscious pursuit or a subconscious one, but it is always there and reveals itself in the work at any given time.

My recent work began as an endeavor to purposefully avoid thoughts and ideas related to family, childhood, and trauma. Each piece was a design challenge created to keep myself focused on technicalities. However, some things never leave a person and I watched as these consequential experiences leaked out through my work. Some were dripping in remnants of the very thing they were meant to keep my mind away from, others alluded to additional methods of distraction such as substance abuse and relationships. This resulted in the use of furniture as an outlet to explore the ways that I have used distraction as a coping mechanism, and how that strategy has affected me. I intend to continue making work that straddles this idea of using furniture as a vehicle to pull answers out of myself, and manifest them into things that are beautiful, intricate, and serve a purpose.


bio.

Nashville based woodworker, Lexie Moore is an award-winning fine furniture maker. Her work is characterized by sharp geometric patterns created using a variety of exotic veneer and intricate hand-carved elements as components of larger structural furnishings. She received her Bachelor of Fine Art degree with a concentration in Wood from the Appalachian Center for Craft, a satellite campus of Tennessee Tech University. She has been featured in group and solo exhibitions all throughout the country. Inspiration for her work is drawn from a variety of subjects, from forms in nature to conceptual outlooks and ideas related to family life, childhood, and social norms/expectations.